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Memorex Pocketvision 26

I bought this small TV from a Radio Shack back in my college days (1990s) and recently (April 2020) powered it back on as I needed a portable video monitor.  I found that the audio worked ok, but there was dim picture.  Just a dim green haze.

I opened the unit up and upon close inspection saw a stain on the power supply board (connects to the batteries).  I found a corroded 330uF 6.3V electrolytic on the other side, marked C116.  This was replaced (large orange capacitor in image below) and the board was cleaned.  There was a corroded SMT transistor on the other side, and I was not optimistic about it working.


Inside of the Pocketvision.  The orange capacitor was replaced.  I documented my work
with a silver Sharpie pen.


A test shows that the TV worked once again.


The A/V cable was a special order.  The resistor is 46KOhm.

One accessory I bought along with the TV was the A/V cable.  The end that plugs into the TV is a regular 'stereo' mini-jack.  As you can see above, the 'tip' is the Audio, the 'ring' is the Video, and the 'sleeve' is the reference return.

There is also an external antenna connector.  Not very useful these days, but I decided to investigate that one as well.  This is also the same type of mini-plug as used above, but the 'ring' is the antenna (through a few pF blocking capacitor in the TV), and both the 'sleeve' and 'tip' are reference return.

Finally, there is a power input jack as well, which I did not investigated.  You can see it in the bottom right in the first image above.  I did notice a diode in series with this input jack, so that is good protection.  The connector looked like a small barrel type.  As an additional power note, I tried using four fully charged NiMH batteries (about 1.3V each) and the unit did not power up.

Value of this small TV at the time of this writing is very low, about $30 on Ebay.  However, I am happy I did not junk this item and I may use this as a small monitor again.

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(c) Edward Cheung, 2020